Thursday, August 1, 2013

The Power of Self-Nurturing

              “Tell the world you are one of a kind creation who came here to experience
                                               Wonder and spread joy”
                                                                                                                -Victoria Moran


The word “selfish” has gotten a bad rap. There is selfishness and there is selfish.  Selfish means “about the self.” I personally don’t see anything wrong with being about one's self; unless we are always just about our self.

Knowing ourselves, taking care of ourselves, and valuing ourselves are marvelous traits. If we don’t value and nurture ourselves, who will, and who will teach our children?

The eighth key and the topic for the month of August is the Power of Self-Nurturing. During the next four weeks we will explore how by nurturing ourselves, we nurture our relationships and the greater community while also becoming more whole, vital and healthy individuals.

In the work that I do with clients, I look at the words, motions, body language, and how they all manifest in the body as illness and pain.   I then use that information to unlock the secrets and traumas of a client’s past.  Listening with what I call “true sight” is a very powerful tool. 

As a society we down play the importance of self-care and self-nurturing in favor of caring first for others, but I that is just plain backwards.  As a chiropractor I believe in and care for others and the greater community, but I also know that this requires time and permission to care for myself first.

When society tells us that being selfish is a “bad” thing, I often look behind or before our time to see with bigger eyes and a bigger lens, what events might have occurred to create this belief system. What might have happened to our ancestors to create the illusion that taking care of ourselves has a bad outcome?

In my work I have heard many stories of horrible things happening while someone was self-occupied. One example is that a mother was getting dressed and grooming herself with leisure as she was pregnant and was taking time for herself. She had a baby sitter for her young son and the sitter accidently drove over her son in the driveway, not seeing him. The mother never forgave herself and of course became over protective of her other children and hyper vigilant as a result. In that family, taking time for oneself has become something they don’t do or can’t do without anxiety. 

I have worked with many people who come into my office and have observed how their legs fidget, they bite their nails, or they are physically twitching slightly. After asking them how they are and what their concerns are, they usually reveal some form of low grade background anxiety. For some, just to come in and see me is reason for anxiety; because it is for them. 

This month I will write about self nurturing from different aspects. It is a powerful tool for us, without which, we lose our energy, vitality, and we can become angry or resentful. Caring for ourselves on a deep nurturing level can also help to heal old issues and traumas in the past. And, as we care for ourselves and heal ourselves, we give our future generations the ability to care for themselves more freely. This is a wonderful gift of wholeness and vitality not only to ourselves but to future generations.


Recommended Resources:

We learn the art of self-nurturing from our parents. Ironically many of our parents don’t take care of themselves very well.  I recommend getting a good Chiropractic treatment where your body and soul are re-aligned and balanced. Check out my website, www.bodypresencing.com, and click on Chiropractic to read about how I treat my patients from a chiropractic perspective.


Another great way to gain more consciousness and spiritual tools to understand yourself and the world is the Kabbalah Center.  Go to www.kabbalah.com to learn about this transforming work.